Mono County, California

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County of Mono
County
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Mono Lake, the dominant geographical feature in Mono County
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Seal
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Location in the state of California
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California's location in the United States
Coordinates: 37°55′N 118°52′W / 37.917°N 118.867°W / 37.917; -118.867Coordinates: 37°55′N 118°52′W / 37.917°N 118.867°W / 37.917; -118.867
Country Click to View Image United States
State Click to View Image California
Region Eastern California
Founded 1861
Named for Mono Lake
County seat Bridgeport
Largest city Mammoth Lakes (population and area)
Government
 • Board of Supervisors
 • 25th State Assembly District Kristin Olsen (R)
 • 1st State Senate District Ted Gaines (R)
 • 8th U.S. House District Paul Cook (R)
Area
 • Total 3,132 sq mi (8,110 km2)
 • Land 3,049 sq mi (7,900 km2)
 • Water 83 sq mi (210 km2)
Population (2010)
 • Total 14,202
 • Density 4.5/sq mi (1.8/km2)
Time zone Pacific Standard Time (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) Pacific Daylight Time (UTC-7)
Area code(s) 442 and 760
Website www.monocounty.ca.gov

Mono County /ˈmn/(mow know) is a county located in the east central portion of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the population was 14,202.[1] making it the fifth-least populous county in California. The county seat is Bridgeport.[2][3] The county is located east of the Sierra Nevada between Yosemite National Park and Nevada.

The only incorporated town in the county is Mammoth Lakes,[4] which is located at the foot of Mammoth Mountain.[5] Other locations, such as June Lake, are also famous as skiing and fishing resorts. Located in the middle of the county is Mono Lake, a vital habitat for millions of migratory and nesting birds. The lake is located in a wild natural setting, with pinnacles of tufa arising out of the salty and alkaline lake.

Also located in Mono County is Bodie, the official state gold rush ghost town, which is now a California State Historic Park.

History

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Bodie, as seen from the hill looking to the cemetery

Mono County was formed in 1861 from parts of Calaveras, Fresno and Mariposa counties. Parts of the county's territory were given to Inyo County in 1866.

The county is named after Mono Lake which, in 1852, was named for a Native American Paiute tribe, the Mono people, who historically inhabited the Sierra Nevada from north of Mono Lake to Owens Lake. The tribe's western neighbors, the Yokut, called them monachie, meaning "fly people" because they used fly larvae as their chief food staple and trading article.[6]

Archeologists know almost nothing about the first inhabitants of the county, as little material evidence has been found from them. The Kuzedika, a band of Paiute, had been there many generations by the time the first anglophones arrived. The Kuzedika were hunter-gatherers and their language is a part of the Shoshone language.[6]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 3,132 square miles (8,110 km2), of which 3,049 square miles (7,900 km2) is land and 83 square miles (210 km2) (2.6%) is water.[7]

Adjacent counties

National protected areas

Transportation

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The Mono County Court House in Bridgeport.

Major highways

Public transportation

Eastern Sierra Transit Authority operates intercity bus service along U.S. 395, as well as local services in Mammoth Lakes. Service extends south to Lancaster, California (Los Angeles County) and north to Reno, Nevada.

Yosemite Area Regional Transit System (YARTS) also runs along U.S. 395 from Mammoth Lakes to Lee Vining before entering Yosemite National Park.

Airports

General aviation airports in Mono County include Bryant Field near Bridgeport, Mammoth Yosemite Airport and Lee Vining Airport. In December 2008, Mammoth Yosemite Airport began commercial air service to Los Angeles International Airport on a seasonal (December to April) basis; the service is provided by Horizon Air, and is subsidized by Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort.

Crime

The following table includes the number of incidents reported and the rate per 1,000 persons for each type of offense.

Cities by population and crime rates

Demographics

2011

Places by population, race, and income

2010

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 430
1880 7,499 1,644.0%
1890 2,002 −73.3%
1900 2,167 8.2%
1910 2,042 −5.8%
1920 960 −53.0%
1930 1,360 41.7%
1940 2,299 69.0%
1950 2,115 −8.0%
1960 2,213 4.6%
1970 4,016 81.5%
1980 8,577 113.6%
1990 9,956 16.1%
2000 12,853 29.1%
2010 14,202 10.5%
Est. 2013 14,074 −0.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[18]
1790-1960[19] 1900-1990[20]
1990-2000[21] 2010-2013[1]

The 2010 United States Census reported that Mono County had a population of 14,202. The racial makeup of Mono County was 11,697 (82.4%) White, 47 (0.3%) African American, 302 (2.1%) Native American, 192 (1.4%) Asian, 11 (0.1%) Pacific Islander, 1,539 (10.8%) from other races, and 414 (2.9%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3,762 persons (26.5%).[22]

2000

As of the census[23] of 2000, there were 12,853 people, 5,137 households, and 3,143 families residing in the county. The population density was 4/sq mi (1.5/km2). There were 11,757 housing units at an average density of 4/sq mi (1.5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 84.2% White, 0.5% Black or African American, 2.4% Native American, 1.1% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 9.5% from other races, and 2.3% from two or more races. 17.7% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 13.4% were of German, 12.6% Irish and 11.4% English ancestry according to Census 2000. 84.0% spoke English and 15.1% Spanish as their first language.

There were 5,137 households out of which 28.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.6% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.8% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 2.98.

In the county the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 10.3% from 18 to 24, 33.4% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 7.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 121.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 126.8 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $44,992, and the median income for a family was $50,487. Males had a median income of $32,600 versus $26,227 for females. The per capita income for the county was $23,422. About 6.3% of families and 11.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.2% of those under age 18 and 1.9% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

Voter registration statistics

Cities by population and voter registration

Overview

Mono County vote
by party in presidential elections
Year GOP DEM Others
2012 44.8% 2,202 52.4% 2,574 2.9% 141
2008 42.3% 2,354 55.6% 3,093 2.2% 124
2004 49.1% 2,621 49.2% 2,628 1.7% 89
2000 52.5% 2,296 40.9% 1,788 6.6% 287
1996 46.0% 1,882 38.6% 1,580 15.4% 629
1992 36.1% 1,570 34.2% 1,489 29.8% 1,296
1988 61.4% 2,177 36.2% 1,284 2.4% 86
1984 72.3% 2,659 26.2% 962 1.5% 56
1980 62.3% 2,132 25.3% 865 12.4% 424
1976 58.8% 1,600 37.7% 1,025 3.5% 96
1972 66.9% 1,872 29.6% 828 3.5% 99
1968 64.3% 1,130 26.5% 465 9.3% 163
1964 56.1% 850 43.9% 666 0.0% 0
1960 66.3% 912 33.2% 457 0.4% 6
1956 73.8% 673 26.0% 237 0.2% 2
1952 76.6% 891 22.7% 264 0.7% 8
1948 64.8% 541 30.5% 255 4.7% 39
1944 60.9% 378 39.0% 242 0.2% 1
1940 46.1% 459 52.6% 523 1.3% 13
1936 34.1% 241 64.8% 458 1.1% 8
1932 34.3% 199 64.4% 374 1.4% 8
1928 61.8% 220 35.7% 127 2.5% 9
1924 53.6% 166 14.5% 45 31.9% 99
1920 67.7% 170 22.3% 56 10.0% 25

Mono used to be a Republican-leaning county in Presidential and congressional elections but has become more of a swing county in recent elections, going for John Kerry by an extremely slim margin of seven votes in 2004. In 2008, Barack Obama did substantially better, receiving 739 more votes (a 13.3% margin) than Republican candidate John McCain.[25] Prior to 2004, the last Democrat to win a majority in the county was Franklin Roosevelt in 1940.

In November 2008, Mono County was one of just three counties in California's interior in which voters rejected Proposition 8 to ban gay marriage. The county's voters rejected Proposition 8 by 55.5 percent to 44.5 percent. The other interior counties in which Proposition 8 failed to receive a majority of votes were neighboring Alpine County and Yolo County.[26]

Mono County is in California's 8th congressional district, represented by Republican Paul Cook.[27]

In the state legislature Mono is in the 25th Assembly district, which is held by Republican Kristin Olsen, and the 1st Senate district, which is held by Republican Ted Gaines.

Communities


See also

Notes

References

Further reading

  • Rockwell, G. L.; Honeywell, P. D. (2004). Water-quality data for selected stream sites in Bridgeport Valley, Mono County, California, April 2000 to June 2003. U.S. Geological Survey Data Series 89. Reston, VA: U.S. Department of the Interior, U.S. Geological Survey. 

External links