This calendar of events represents typical school and legal holidays but is not the official calendar for Lake Don Pedro Elementary School in the Mariposa County Unified School District.

Please do not rely on this calendar for official school holidays, schedules or closures. Contact the school at 209-852-2144 or on their official website for further information.
March 1, 2015
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
01
Kennedy establishes Peace Corps, 1961
Yellowstone Park established, 1872
02
Dr. Seuss born, 1904
Congress abolishes the African slave trade, 1807
Texas declares independence, 1836
Pioneer 10 launched to Jupiter, 1972
Kennedy proposes plan to end the war, 1967
03
Congress passes the Missouri Compromise, 1820
"The Star-Spangled Banner" becomes official, 1931
First indoor game of ice hockey, 1875
04
FDR inaugurated, 1933
Lincoln sworn in for first presidential term, 1861
Government under the U.S. Constitution begins, 1789
Ernest Hemingway finishes The Old Man and the Sea, 1952
05
Hula-Hoop patented, 1963
Civilians and soldiers clash in the Boston Massacre, 1770
Churchill delivers Iron Curtain speech, 1946
06
Bayer patents aspirin, 1899
The Rosenberg trial begins, 1951
Michelangelo born, 1475
Monroe signs the Missouri Compromise, 1820
07
Alexander Graham Bell patents the telephone, 1876
Kathryn Bigelow becomes the first female director to win an Oscar, 2010
08
Daylight Saving Time Begins
International Womens Day
Mount Etna erupts, 1669
Egypt opens the Suez Canal, 1957
Ali battles Frazier for heavyweight championship, 1971
09
Pancho Villa raids U.S., 1916
Virginia Woolf delivers her first novel, The Voyage Out, 1913
10
Speech transmitted by telephone, 1876
11
Congress establishes the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1779
Frankenstein published, 1818
12
Gandhi leads civil disobedience, 1930
Jack Kerouac is born, 1922
The Dixie Chicks backlash begins, 2003
13
U.S. Army launches K-9 Corps, 1942
Confederacy approves black soldiers, 1865
William Hershel discovers Uranus, 1781
14
Albert Einstein born, 1879
Gorbachev elected president of the Soviet Union, 1990
The FBI debuts 10 Most Wanted, 1950
15
Julius Caesar is stabbed, 44 B.C.
Mar 15, 1767: Andrew Jackson born
16
Purim in United States
U.S. Military Academy established, 1802
The Scarlet Letter is published, 1850
Mar 16, 1751: James Madison is born
17
St. Patrick's Day
Evacuation Day
18
19
20
Spring Begins
March equinox
21
22
23
24
25
Maryland Day
26
Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day
27
28
29
30
Doctor's Day
31
Seward's Day
César Chávez Day
       


Upcoming Events
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Tuesday, March 3, 2015
 
Congress passes the Missouri Compromise, 1820
After months of bitter debate, Congress passes the Missouri Compromise, a bill that temporarily resolves the first serious political clash between slavery and antislavery interests in U.S. history. In February 1819, Representative James Tallmadge of New York introduced a bill that would admit Missouri into the Union as a state where slavery was prohibited. At the time, there were 11 free states and 10 slave states. Southern congressmen feared that the entrance of Missouri as a free state would upset the balance of power between North and South, as the North far outdistanced the South in population, and thus, U.S. representatives. Opponents to the bill also questioned the congressional precedent of prohibiting the expansion of slavery into a territory where slave status was favored. 
 
"The Star-Spangled Banner" becomes official, 1931
President Herbert Hoover signs a congressional act making "The Star-Spangled Banner" the official national anthem of the United States. On September 14, 1814, Francis Scott Key composed the lyrics to "The Star-Spangled Banner" after witnessing the massive overnight British bombardment of Fort McHenry in Maryland during the War of 1812. Key, an American lawyer, watched the siege while under detainment on a British ship and penned the famous words after observing with awe that Fort McHenry's flag survived the 1,800-bomb assault. After circulating as a handbill, the patriotic lyrics were published in a Baltimore newspaper on September 20, 1814. Key's words were later set to the tune of "To Anacreon in Heaven," a popular English song. Throughout the 19th century, "The Star-Spangled Banner" was regarded as the national anthem by most branches of the U.S. armed forces and other groups, but it was not until 1916, and the signing of an executive order by President Woodrow Wilson, that it was formally designated as such. In March 1931, Congress passed an act confirming Wilson's presidential order, and on March 3 President Hoover signed it into law. 
 
First indoor game of ice hockey, 1875
On March 3, 1875, indoor ice hockey makes its public debut in Montreal, Quebec. After weeks of training at the Victoria Skating Rink with his friends, Montreal resident James Creighton advertised in the March 3 edition of the Montreal Gazette that "A game of hockey will be played in the Victoria Skating Rink this evening between two nines chosen from among the members." Prior to the move indoors, ice hockey was a casual outdoor game, with no set dimensions for the ice and no rules regarding the number of players per side. The Victoria Skating Rink was snug, so Creighton limited the teams to nine players each.  
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
 
FDR inaugurated, 1933
On March 4, 1933, at the height of the Great Depression, Franklin Delano Roosevelt is inaugurated as the 32nd president of the United States. In his famous inaugural address, delivered outside the east wing of the U.S. Capitol, Roosevelt outlined his "New Deal"--an expansion of the federal government as an instrument of employment opportunity and welfare--and told Americans that "the only thing we have to fear is fear itself." Although it was a rainy day in Washington, and gusts of rain blew over Roosevelt as he spoke, he delivered a speech that radiated optimism and competence, and a broad majority of Americans united behind their new president and his radical economic proposals to lead the nation out of the Great Depression. 
 
Lincoln sworn in for first presidential term, 1861
On this day in 1861, Abraham Lincoln becomes the 16th president of the United States. In his inauguration speech Lincoln extended an olive branch to the South, but also made it clear that he intended to enforce federal laws in the states that seceded. Since Lincoln's election in November 1860, seven states had left the Union. Worried that the election of a Republican would threaten their rights, especially slavery, the lower South seceded and formed the Confederate States of America. In the process, some of those states seized federal properties such as armories and forts. By the time Lincoln arrived in Washington, D.C., for his inauguration, the threat of war hung heavy in the air. Lincoln took a cautious approach in his remarks, and made no specific threats against the Southern states. As a result, he had some flexibility in trying to keep the states of the upper South--North Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, Arkansas, Missouri, Kentucky, Maryland, and Delaware--in the Union. 
 
Government under the U.S. Constitution begins, 1789
The first session of the U.S. Congress is held in New York City as the U.S. Constitution takes effect. However, of the 22 senators and 59 representatives called to represent the 11 states who had ratified the document, only nine senators and 13 representatives showed up to begin negotiations for its amendment. In 1786, defects in the Articles of Confederation became apparent, such as the lack of central authority over foreign and domestic commerce and the inability of Congress to levy taxes, leading Congress to endorse a plan to draft a new constitution. On September 17, 1787, at the conclusion of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, the new U.S. Constitution, creating a strong federal government with an intricate system of checks and balances, was signed by 38 of 41 delegates to the convention. 
 
Ernest Hemingway finishes The Old Man and the Sea, 1952
Ernest Hemingway completes his short novel The Old Man and the Sea. He wrote his publisher the same day, saying he had finished the book and that it was the best writing he had ever done. The critics agreed: The book won the Pulitzer Prize in 1953 and became one of his bestselling works. 
Thursday, March 5, 2015
 
Hula-Hoop patented, 1963
On this day in 1963, the Hula-Hoop, a hip-swiveling toy that became a huge fad across America when it was first marketed by Wham-O in 1958, is patented by the company's co-founder, Arthur "Spud" Melin. An estimated 25 million Hula-Hoops were sold in its first four months of production alone. 
 
Civilians and soldiers clash in the Boston Massacre, 1770
On the cold, snowy night of March 5, 1770, a mob of angry colonists gathers at the Customs House in Boston and begins tossing snowballs and rocks at the lone British soldier guarding the building. The protesters opposed the occupation of their city by British troops, who were sent to Boston in 1768 to enforce unpopular taxation measures passed by a British parliament without direct American representation. 
 
Churchill delivers Iron Curtain speech, 1946
In one of the most famous orations of the Cold War period, former British Prime Minister Winston Churchill condemns the Soviet Union's policies in Europe and declares, "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the continent." Churchill's speech is considered one of the opening volleys announcing the beginning of the Cold War.